Crafts - Mailable Cake Post Card

9:29 AM


I first saw this tutorial a few years back on She Knows.   The tutorial posted there is GREAT and it's how I learned how to make this delicious mailable confection.  BUT and HOWEVER - there is more to this story than you think!

This craft looks easy and fun.  It's easy.  It's kind of fun but it takes a LOT OF TIME and PATIENCE!  Know that before you tackle this beauty.  Due to my amazingly short attention span I prefer projects that I can complete in an hour or 2.  This most recent batch of cake took me 3 months to make!!!

NOW - had I done each step as soon as the previous step was dry I could have completed this project in a week (or 2).  STILL that's a LONG time to wait on a craft!  A LONG TIME!!!

That notwithstanding - I'll walk you through my process.  If you live in a dry climate maybe it will be faster for you.  Or maybe you're just more patient than me - totally possible!

For this craft you will need:
(assuming you're making chocolate cake with chocolate frosting)
- 1 large sponge (makes 4 slices of cake)
- 1 can brown spray paint
- 2 tubes of brown caulk
- 1 caulk gun
- 1 piece of card stock
- tacky glue
- electric knife, or razor knife
Sharpie

Ok - so I don't know what this sponge is called.  It looks like this:



I found it in the aisle with the floor tile.  It cost about $2 at home depot.

Mark the 1/2 way point and cut the sponge in half.

Use the sharpie to mark the sponge
Use an electric knife for easy cutting
Now cut each half on the diagonal.

Cut each 1/2 in 1/2 again


Sliced !

How you have 4 slices of cake.

Next, you'll need to cut a channel for the frosting.


Mark and cut your channels.  Don't make these too deep or wide.


Once the channel is cut, you're ready to paint!

Grab your spray paint, and lay the sponges out flat.  I prefer a glossy paint.  It gives the cake a moist look.


Spray paint your cake and let it dry.  Spray every side of the cake but don't soak it in paint.  A soaked sponge takes FOREVER to completely dry!



Once the slices are dry (about 3-4 days in my case), you're ready for the frosting.


I bought brown window caulk.  Using a caulk gun,frost the channel you cut.

Frost the channel you cut 
Next frost the top and the back edge of each cake slice.


I made several large lines of "frosting" then used a plastic knife to spread it around.




You can only frost 1 side the the cake at a time.  Focus first on the channel side of the cake.  Then do the top and back edge.  


Place the slices on plastic or wax paper and leave them to dry.  It took about a week and a half for my slices to be 100% dry.

Next measure and cut the card stock for the other (non channel) side of the cake.


Cut the card stock to size and glue in place.  


Once the card is dry (a day or two) add frosting to the card side of the slice.  You just need a little frosting around the edges of the card.

Now let that dry. (about 5 days).

Once your card is completely dry, it's ready to mail!






These delicious slices cost about $3.00 each to mail.

It's a lot of work and a lot of waiting time but SO WORTH IT!  Most people have never received a slice of cake in their mailbox!  It's a delightful treat!

These slices are super durable and NOT edible!!!!!!  You don't need to package it to mail it.  Just add stamps.

PRO TIP:
If you like this idea, but don't have time to make it - you can buy them on etsy.  Search "cake post card" or "mailable cake".  There's not 1 place that I recommend - shop around and read reviews.

SUPER PRO TIP:  
These slices can come in any "flavor".  To reduce the amount of time it takes to make this treat, buy a colored sponge or make yellow cake using an unpainted sponge.

For more CRAFTY ideas, click HERE!

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3 comments

  1. I can't get over how much the sponge, painted, looks like a real piece of cake...then with the frosting!! Awesome....thanks for sharing!

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  2. FANTASTIC! Thanks for sharing! Out of curiosity, I checked Etsy, and their postcard cakes all looked very amateur. Yours is absolutely gorgeous, and an excellent example of how to do it well.

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